8 Prevention Tips for Toxoplasmosis (Part 1)

8 Prevention Tips for Toxoplasmosis (Part 1)

When it comes to toxoplasmosis infections, most adults who become infected can expect to get away with absolutely no symptoms at all, living with the infection but having an immune system that is more than capable of fighting it off.

On some occasions, the parasitic disease will cause people to experience relatively mild, flu like symptoms for a short period of time. These symptoms include the relatively harmless swollen lymph nodes, headaches and muscle pains.

For a small group of people however, those living with HIV, or other immunodeficiency conditions, as well as pregnant women, toxoplasmosis can prevent a much more serious threat. This means that, where possible, steps should be taking to affect a vulnerable person from contracting the infection. Some of these prevention tips may seem more obvious than others, but they are all worth considering, after all, prevention is always significantly better than the cure. Read these prevention tips carefully.

1. Reduce Risk From Food

One of the best ways to prevent the threat of a whole host of infections, including toxoplasmosis, from entering the body via food, is to ensure that food is always cooked to safe temperatures. Food thermometers are the safest, most scientific kitchen tool to ensure this, as simply observing the color of an item of food is far from reliable when it comes to indicating the necessary. In this case, the necessary indications would be that the food has been cooked up to a hot enough temperature in order to kill potentially harmful pathogens, toxoplasma included. Meat in particular should never be sampled until is properly cooked, if this prevention method is to be fully effective, however it isn’t just when cooking meat that one must abide by the rule of cooking food to the right temperature. It just so happens that meat is the most likely transmitter of toxoplasmosis, in terms of food sources.

2. Reduce Risk From Meat

With the information that meat is a potential transmission risk in mind, successful prevention of infection requires certain cooking rules to be observed and followed. Whole cuts of meat, not including poultry, should be cooked to a temperature of at least 145° F (63° C), and again, this should be tested with a food thermometer. Placing the thermometer in the thickest part of the meat is the only way to be as accurate as possible. Where poultry is concerned, an even higher temperature than that for whole and ground meats is necessary to ensure pathogens are killed off. The process of checking the temperature of a cooked chicken should involve readings being taken from the innermost point of both thighs, the inside edges of both wings and from within the thickest part of the breast. Following these temperature guidelines when cooking meat is a very effective way of reducing the risk of infection from toxoplasmosis causing parasites.

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